Monday, 13 January 2014

Woodland Scenics Track and Wheel Cleaning Tools Update

About a year ago, I wrote a post detailing my initial impressions on the Woodland Scenics tools that I had purchased around December 2012. (http://philipscreek.blogspot.com.au/2013/01/track-and-wheel-cleaning.html).

This piece provides a short update 12 months down the track so to speak.
 

The track cleaner has been used extensively and is an effective tool for track maintenance. The rubberised pads (the only ones that I used) have worn, but that is to be expected and they are not to the point of needing replacement.

My earlier post was more circumspect about the wheel cleaning tool and it languished, almost unused, over the past 12 months. On the few occasions when I did try to operate it, the tool usually failed to activate the locomotive long enough to complete any significant wheel cleaning action. However, a recent comment on the original post by Bill Roach
provided a suggestion that prompted me to have another try.

Bill had sprayed the white cleaning treads on the tool with CRC 2-26. Having finally been able to locate a can of this fabled product, I was able to do the same. In addition, I also sought to address the tightness and lack of movement in the centre plate (the black middle section with the two brass contact strips running longitudinally) that had previously inhibited the cleaning process. To achieve this, I pushed the white cleaning treads outward slightly until the centre plate moved freely. Previously, I had suspected that this would reduce the contact between the wheel and the cleaning tread but this does not appear to be the case. 

The results are shown on the two photo below.


And a bit closer...


I don't know if it was the CRC 2-26 or the adjustment to the cleaning treads or a combination of the two but the wheel cleaner certainly operated more effectively, and at least now, I don't feel the purchase 12 months ago was wasted.

PS. The darker area on the first photo is due to the mug photographer forgetting where the light was.



  

8 comments:

  1. G'day Phil

    I would love to be able to buy the CRC 2-26 in non aerosol to use in the Atlas track cleaner I have, not sure if its made though.

    I used to be sceptical about the aerosol product doing the job that so many in our group spoke about, but as they were people who knew what they were doing, & much better modellers than I will ever be, I decided to give it a try.

    I have not cleaned my track for some length of time now, but as nothing has ran for well over 12 months there would be a lot of residual dust on the rails as well as muck from the work I am doing.

    The method I use with the CRC is to make some cork rubbers out of 38x18 bits of pine, cut & glue some cork underlay (the thicker the better, I have 4mm) onto the offcuts, leave for the glue to thoroughly dry out & then spray the cork with the CRC, & rub along the track, this assumes there is no crud build up & the CRC will keep the trains operating very well indeed, the aspect that I like about it as well is how it aids in electrical pick ups.

    Prior to my next running of trains, I will be going over the whole track with a rubbling using a Peco cleaning bloke, then apply the CRC. Brilliant stuff.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Colin,

      Thanks for the comments and your earlier recommendation on CRC 2-26. As I mentioned in the post, I was able to finally get a can but it took a bit of searching as my local Repco doesn't stock it.

      While I was experimenting with the wheel cleaner, my first attempt at applying CRC was to spray it directly but I thought it was too much and might actually facilitate a short circuit. I then sprayed some into a small container and applied it as a liquid using a cotton bud. You may be able to do similar thing on a larger scale to use in your Atlas track cleaner. However, I'm not sure about the evaporation rate of the product. Certainly the small amount that I decanted into the open container did not last too long.

      cheers Phil

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  2. Hi Phil,

    Your a more patient man than I. Mine is at the Nowra rubbish tip ha ha.

    Linton

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    Replies
    1. Linton,

      I was tempted but couldn't bring myself to get rid of something that was relatively new. Certainly, it did not operate well straight out of the box and could do with some improvement if the manufacturer was so inclined.

      cheers Phil

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  3. Phil

    Take the screws from the bottom and then remove all or part of the 'springing'. I found that this made it a more useful tool as our steam locos aren't as heavy as US diesels and large steam which I am sure it was made for.

    Ray P

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    Replies
    1. Ray,

      Thanks for the suggestion. I had already reduced the amount of foam that provides the uplift in one of my earlier experiments. However, it didn't seem to provide for a uniform movement over the length of the wheel cleaner. I am getting the sense that the individual unit that I purchased may have not been within the normal operating tolerances. Moving the cleaning treads combined with the earlier reduction in the 'springing' plus the CRC has made it a more useful tool.

      cheers Phil

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  4. Pretty good post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed reading your blog posts. Any way I’ll be subscribing to your feed and I hope you post again soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many thanks. I hope it has been helpful. There are a couple of projects under way. the turret tender is substantially complete and presently being painted and in the medium term, the completion of the scenery of the new module. Both will be the subject of separate posts.

      cheers Phil

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